Blog Archives for category Kitchen tips

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Dosa Recipe with unfermented Idli-Dosa batter | Idli-Dosa batter fermentation issues

How to use unfermented idli-dosa batter ~ How to make dosai using unfermented idli-dosa batter I told you that it was the heavy snow season when I first landed in the US, right? I hardly saw any human-being walking in my apartment street . I had doubts if people even lived in the other apartment blocks. The husband too turned out to be a ‘cyber-being’ warming up his spot in the sofa with his eyes glued to his laptop screen. At times I’ve wondered what if I place some eggs underneath his warm seat so that it hatches into chicks and I can use them to make some chicken korma . Fat furry squirrels running across the street to pick the pine nuts was all I could see from my glass windows. Snow made me too weak that I had to stay shivering in the furnace room like a sick… Continue reading »

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How to ferment Idly batter during cold climate ~ How to make Idli batter using mixie (mixer grinder)

How to grind South-Indian Idly batter using mixie | Tamilnadu Idli-dosa batter recipe What do you think when a girl from the southern parts of India suddenly lands on a vast space covered full of snow? … Gets super-excited? Jumps with joy? Starts to dance in the snowfall?? Nah, it is none of the above. Believe it or not, the first fear that struck me when I landed in the US was ‘how can I ferment the Idly batter in such a cold climate!’ The snow brought me nostalgia of Idlis and Dosas so very soon that I did not even reach my apartment from the airport. In India, Amma used to grind the batter in the morning and have the fermented batter ready by the afternoons during the summers. Or she grinds the idly batter during the night and gives us the pleasure of tasting soft fluffy idlis the… Continue reading »

Botany class on how to dissect and clean banana flower

 How to clean Vazhaipoo – Banana Blossom – Banana flower Banana blossom is maroon in color (some describe it as purple in color). The actual flowers are covered and protected inside this maroon layer. There will be several maroon layers, each layer sheltering 13-14 cute banana flowers – arranged in 2 rows of 6 or 7 flowers each.   Remove the maroon layer from top-down. When you do so, you’ll find the little banana flowers beautifully lined in two rows – 6 or 7 flowers in each row. Remove the flowers from the maroon layer. The flowers will be pale-yellow in color with beautiful pink strokes below and dark-yellow strokes above. In the Indian market near my house I never find any fresh banana flower. So the flowers shown in my pictures will not go along with the description of my colors. Bear with it. Pink strokes are browned in my… Continue reading »