Then Mittai (Thaen Mittai Recipe) | Honey Sugar Candy

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  • Prep time:
  • Cook time:
  • Total time:
  • Yield: Six, 2 candy each
  • Difficulty: easy

Ingredients:

  • Maida/All-purpose flour – 1 cup
  • Curd/Yogurt – 2 tblsp
  • Sugar – 1 cup
  • Oil for deep frying
  • Water – ½ cup
  • Color – just a pinch

Thaen mittai (Then Mittai) –  Honey Sugar Candy | தேன் மிட்டாய்

Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe

 

Hi Ya! I’m happily introducing Project “Pori Vandi” (Stress on the ‘r’ and ‘nd’) :) in this post. Does the project name look strange?  Pori means puffed-rice (Mori) and Vandi means vehicle. Now to the story behind the project name:

We all know that power cuts in Tamilnadu are like a custom that is followed for spans and spans of years. Power-cuts are almost traditional, we should say. How about preparing a nice spicy, steaming hot lunch and waiting for the ‘Power’ – the electricity? Very horrible right? But being kids we never grumble on the power-cuts those days. We normally have our own pass-time games. The ‘thambola’ or the ‘dhaayam’ or the ‘hide-and-seek’ or the ‘thirudan-police/Raja-Rani’ or the serious moans for the gold-fish and the blue-tailed fish that died in the fish tank and constructing a mud cemetery for it in the sand heaped in the neighborhood.  And when the power arrives…everybody shouts with joy in their highest pitch….”yayyyyy… currentu vandhuduchuu……….” :D and run into their respective houses for lunch, abandoning the games. This is how we used to enjoy our Annual-exam holidays at Trichy.

And sometimes, the power would not come for a long time and we had to eat the steaming lunch in that scorching summer with sweat running down all over our face. The whole family sits in the dining hall, down in the floor, making an oval shape, circulating a hand-fan from one person to another. Finishing lunch, when we all lay lazily like an over-eaten, fat cobra in the sofa and are about to fall asleep in the late silent afternoon, this bell of the puffed rice vendor will ring. He makes this bell sound with an iron ladle and iron wok in his hand-push vehicle. Only this ringing of the bell and no hawking. On hearing this bell ring, all these lazy cobras will now become lively :). We get some coins from grandma or our aunt and get whatever we like from the snacks-car. The seller has a good collection of snacks in this snacks-car. The list of the snacks that he has in his vehicle is as long as the tail of an over-grown kangaroo :D Some of them from the long list here,

Thaen mittai (Sugar candy), Pori, Pori urundai (puffed-rice candy – something that tastes like crispy marshmallow), Kadalai urundai (peanut candy – rounded), Koka mittai (cocoa cakes/cocoa candy/ground peanut candy), Kadalai mittai (peanut candy – squared), Ellu urundai (semsame seeds candy), Panju mittai (sonpapdi), Varutha kadala (Roasted peanuts), Varutha pattani (Roasted beans), Rava laddu, Kalkona (a hard but tasty candy with coconut bits), Javvu mittai (Sticky toffee), Thengai burfi (Squared sweet made of coconut), Achchu muruku (crispy sweet rice fritters) <another favorite of mine>, Etcetera Etcetera Etcetera….

 

But I normally get this ‘then mittai’ from the list. I always get two ‘then mittai’. Two will be more than enough. It gives you a satisfaction, a happiness, a complete contentment which you might not get even after eating a full bar of Silky Cadbury chocolate <but yeah, I do not deny that I like Cadbury too :P :P ). At times we used to have a snacks transaction or snacks exchange after the buying of snacks from the seller. One ‘thean mittai’ for a pori urundai or little sonpapdi for a little roasted groundnut etc. But I normally swallow the ‘thaen mittai’ even before everybody realizes what others have got from the seller or even before the transaction starts amongst my cousins :D

 

Now, what is this ‘thaen mittai’? ‘Then mittai’ or ‘thaen mittai’ is a sugary candy, normally pink in color with visible sugar crystals outside and thick, juicy sugar syrup filling inside. The outer surface is little hard but soft enough to bite. They look something like an unpolished pink opal stone. No, they resemble a rough pink sapphire. No no, they actually look like a pink quartz pebble :D. Yeah they truly are a kind of sweet pebble of jewels to possess. I normally do not pop them inside and eat. I hold them in front of me with my left and right hand fingers, examining its color and texture like an experienced merchant of precious-stones, then break them into half. When you break them half, you’ll see this nice pink and thick oasis standing still. Now you should be careful here, since the honey might drop down if you do not hold the candy at the right angle: not right-angle but the ‘right’ angle. You can now drink it or lick it, and then pop the candy inside your mouth, munch it slowly and enjoy.

 

I was searching for this “then mittai – thaen mittai” recipe in the web for almost an hour and google did not yield any results :(. Very sad. Or maybe, I did not give google the right terms to search for the recipe. Then I called Amma and asked if she ever knew how to make “thaen mittai” or at least know the ingredients to add in making “then mittai”. Immediately she said, “I know that it is made only of maida and sugar but do not know the exact procedure”. Given the clue, I added up my own ingredients and here it is… the ‘then mittai’ recipe :) . I never say mittai as mittai but muttai. So you can also read ‘mittai’ as ‘muttai’ like me. I used single or double quotes around the recipe name every time just to give a heads-up for the reader because I myself read ‘then’ as ‘then’ and not ‘thaen’-‘தேன்’ (but the candy sure deserves the quotes for its taste and for the memories it locked inside its thick honey syrup).

 

Did you check the ingredients list? Don’t they resemble the ingredients for making Badhusha? I know you’ll be wondering if I forgot to add “thean” (honey) in the ingredient list. But no, I did not forget. ‘Thaen’ has nothing to with the preparation of ‘thaen mittai’. They added the word “thaen” to this candy just to bring some excitement about the candy and for the false look of the sugar syrup resembling thick honey.

Procedure on how to make Thaen Mittai:

Step 1.
Mix the color in yogurt. Now add this yogurt into the flour little by little so that it gets nicely mixed with the flour. Make a thick dough and close it with a lid. Let this dough rest for few hours. I kept it for an hour. See to it that the yogurt is not too sour.

                Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்  Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்

 

Step 2.
After few hours, make pebble-like rounds with the dough. We need not be too perfect in making the shapes. The beauty of ‘thean muttai’ is its irregular oval shape.

Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்

 

Step 3.
Heat oil in a wok. When the oil is heated enough, drop the dumplings into it and fry them really nice, turning the dumplings down and up at intervals.

                 Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்   Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்

 

Step 4.
Meanwhile make the sugar syrup. In a vessel take water and let it boil in medium heat. Add the sugar into the boiling water and stir it until it dissolves fully. The syrup must be little thick in consistency but just thick enough so that they can be absorbed by the dumplings. Switch off the stove.

Step 5.
Once the dumplings are cooked (takes around 3 minutes), take them out from the oil and let them sit in the paper towel for few seconds.

Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்

 

I was quite excited about this candy and I check the softness of the dumpling after frying.

Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்   Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்

 

Step 6.
Now, put the fried dumplings into the sugar syrup. The dumplings should absorb the sugar syrup nicely (I kept them for 2 hrs). When the dumplings sit in the sugar syrup, gently stir them so that the sugar coats evenly over the dumplings. I added a little (very very little) color to the sugar syrup too.

Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்

 

Step 7.
Remove them from syrup and cool them completely, or if you are greedy and could not control yourself, pop some into your mouth and get your tongue hurt. mmmm…..fresh honey… the sweetness reached my brain and made a ‘tinnngggg’ sound when the juice reached my deep throat :). O please don’t let the honey drop down.. don’t let the honey drop down… for they are priceless than the gold liquid in the goldsmith’s room. So how do you feel? Honey isn’t it? Yeah, Honey’s in it!

Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்

 

I said google did not retrieve any results for this ‘thaen mittai’ recipe. But finding ‘then mittai’ in cities like Madurai is not tough. They are still hung in transparent plastic bags in petty shops – normally in front of the petti kadai.  These plastic bags, holding these sweet treasures, gently move in the evening breeze, silently beckoning the school children to stop by the shop and pop at least two ‘then mittai’ when they are back to home. ‘Then mittai’ are in various colors: Brown, orange and pink. Mostly the shops have this pink version.

So the moral of the post is Power-cuts are almost traditional in Tamilnadu and that the electricity board is getting curses after curses, from generation after generation :P and that you can get a thorough contentment on eating just two little pinky dumplings called the ‘then mittai’ rather spending $s and ₹s in a hi-fi cafe.

I thought only I became mad of such eatables that I started writing mad essays on them. Thank God! Google acted like a psychiatrist to me. I told you that google did not return any results for ‘thaen mittai recipe’. But it did return lotsa similar topics where there were crazy people discussing crazy topics (okay, here ‘crazy’ means ‘lovely’) like this and I became thrilled and excited after visiting those pages.

This is just 5% of the description of what I had in my mind when I decided to post a thread on such memorable eatables. The remaining 95% would be posted one by one in this ‘Pori-vandi’ project, at least in few years’ time. Better one or two years late than never.

This is a special thread created “out-and-out” for my whole maternal family, the childhood friends, the streets we played in, the house we stayed in, and for all those who have similar memories and interests on these snacks which recall the memories of our childhood.

Long live ‘then mittai’!

<evvvv… I shook the camera. Will take a perfect picture next time when I make it. Sorry guys. Picture taken right after soaking the dumplings in the sugar syrup. The candy should be cooled and dried like in the picture above>

Then mittai | Thaen mittai| Thean mittai | Honey Sugar Candy | Thaen Mittai Recipe | தேன் மிட்டாய்

 

Mangala from cooking.jingalala.org
Eat well!

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Dear Readers,
Sure the recipe tastes far great than the pictures shown. To show you the process in making the recipe with step-by-step pictures and to show you the outcome of the recipes with some cool photographs, I spend quite a lot of time in photographing it without minding the food getting dry or limp or not-so-hot-enough for us to eat (or sometimes without minding that we are hungry :)

But your comments can make me forget all my tiresome efforts I spend in deciding, preparing, cooking, shooting and composing a recipe post just for you! If you find the recipe useful please leave us a comment. I would also like to know if you tried the recipe and if the recipe came out well. Even if it didn’t, tell me that. I can guess or figure out what might have gone wrong or if I missed out to put any essential points in my recipe post. You can share the pictures of the tried recipes in our Facebook page or you can e-mail us!

Thank you for your visit.
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  • Dhivya

    oh wow .. thaen mittai.. My favorite too.. :)
    Will definitely give a try Meena…

    Good job.. you are trying out things that can be found in no other website :)

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      Wow wow! Sure Dhivya! and thank you!

  • vijay sj

    Yeah, believe it or not ….. my brother manu and i as kids in the 1960s used to enjoy this ‘thein’ mittai …. We used to eat a helluva lot, but strangely never felt cloyed unlike the other Indian sweets….. perhaps it’s the tiny size!
    BTW …. could ‘mittai’ be a Hindi-origin word?
    The ‘spelling’ could also be ‘thane’ ….. in memory of our cyclone :)
    You should probably advise your readers on how to make SUGAR SYRUP ….. the ratio of sugar:water …. whether there is a particular boiling temperature, etc. Most people will mess up this recipe because of the syrup being too watery or too sticky (i presume!)
    Anyway …. it’s nice to have traveled down memory lane nearly 5 decades …. with ‘sweet’ memories :) Keep up the good stuff!!!

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      Thank you VJ uncle :)

      1. Thane mittai would have been a perfect spelling.
      2. I too thought if the word ‘mittai’ originated from the hindi word ‘mithai’. Have to check this out.
      3. And with the making of sugar syrup, sure I will do that. But do not exactly know how to find the temperature of water. May be I will find some kitchen thermometer in the stores.

  • sasikumar

    Yummy Yummy.. great

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      Sasi… vaanga vaanga..
      Thank you jaji !

  • keerthi

    good work ….have to really try this in free time atleast to impress vasanth!!!!!

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      sure try it Keerthi.

  • http://www.padhuskitchen.com Padhu

    Sounds yummy !

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      Thank you Padhu!

  • Lakshmi

    ahahah .. .. Good narration and link between the time spend lethargic . (or no energy) with time we dream to get… :)

    tinnng to brain and liquid from glodsmith’s room – lol i can feel it .. for this desc.

    Never knew that small fav balls are made this easy….

    but meenu, i remember they used to be dry and not tht sticky.. .. or is tht something else i imagine?

    BTW ..

    Before
    .”yayyyyy… currentu vandhuduchuu……….”
    Now:
    .”yayyyyy… oru mani aacha…????…………” (1 – 2 pm) s scheduled for cuts @our area :D.

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      :D

      You’re right Lakshu, they’ll be dry. It itself will start to dry once the sugar begins to crystalize after cooling them.

  • http://www.cijocyril.com Cijo Cyril

    i tried to made, but output was hard to bite

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      Hi Cijo,
      I think we already met through Rainydays :). Like I said, try mixing the curd nicely with the flour until you form crumbs. Then knead them nicely for 10 minutes.

      Hi All, I am planning to edit this recipe with more specs and video. Especially on the sugar syrup making. First try the recipe with little quantity and write me if you got it perfectly. If it got flopped, sure ping me, I will help you!

  • http://great-secret-of-life.blogspot.com Veena

    I am so excited to find this .. This one I cannot find it in Trichy any more.. this is one of my childhood favourite!! thanks for sharing

    Great-secret-of-life.blogspot.com

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      Veena, you’re welcome!
      Is it true that we cannot find it in Trichy today? ;(
      I will sure hunt for this next time I visit Trichy.

  • srishti

    hi !! i’m really excited after reading this recipe. thank u so much for your wonderful recipe. and ya i should say that the description you have given exactly goes with my childhood days too. whenver i eat thaen mitta it not only brings me the pleasure of taste but also the old sweet memories and the places we used to buy it. Brilliant job by u.. :)

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      Hi Srishti,
      Thank you very much for your wonderful comments. Yes, old sweet memories are the real bags of Gold. :)

  • Ismail

    It Nice to recall /recollect all our childhood foods, which we use to buy from Road side (Petti shop) and eat it as its. without fearing about so called ( Un Hygiene), i would like to know about the Juvvu Mittai, if you have the recipe kindly publish it. Goddddddjob yar

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org Mangala

      Hi Ismail,
      Thanks so much for your comments.
      Yeah I too like Javvu mittai very much. All I know is it’s made of just sugar and the color (pink,brown,yellow).
      I do not have the recipe today. But I already have plans to try them out. Will sure do.

  • Shanmu karthik

    Hi mandala,
    I tried thean mittai but its didn’t come out well and was hardly to bite. But dough was also soft….I don know wat I done mistake? Am awaiting ur reply…..

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org/ Mangala Meenakshi

      Shanmu, I got a similar reply from one of my other friend. I will revisit my recipe and work on it to find if I gave the right measurements. Kindly wait for updates.

  • Vidhya

    I loved the writing style ! It quickly took me to those priceless memorable days! Little pleasure , more fun….

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org/ Mangala Meenakshi

      True true Vidhya! And there used to be an Ice cream vendor (State Ice cream) selling all kinds of kuchchi ice. You remember that? :D

      • vidhya

        “pal ice” esply… well some kind of sweet item in rainbow colours the vendors used to attract kids by making bangles or ring …. wht is tht called? I used ro be crazy of tht whenever I visited for “Thiruvizha “

  • yamuna gunasekaran

    nice try mangala…,
    but am afraid to say that ur total recipe is wrong.
    basically its made of rava ,little maida to bind and yeast and my mom
    used to cook a lot in early 90′s…but nw she totally has no idea of
    that recipe.we had cottage industry in our neighbourhood which makes
    thaen mittai and seedai .so we took recipe from them .we use to visit
    there often…..they soak rava for 3hrs and add maida to bind ,food
    colorand yeast and knead like chappathi dough….they let it to raise
    for an hour. they roll it like chappathi and using cookie cutter or bottle cap
    .and deep fry and drop in one string consistencysugar syrup and shake
    well once u finished cooking and spread in a big plate for the air to
    circulate…i want rely totally on this recipeas it oozed out fm ma very
    bad memory(usually am v poor in memory part…)but still cant resist to
    drop in this recipe as i felt ‘something is better than nothing’.wil b happy if someone try this out and respond to this….

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org/ Mangala Meenakshi

      Yamuna,
      I couldn’t wait to finish reading your comment as I was over excited to try your Thain Mittai Recipe right away!!!! You would’ve read few of my readers’ comments on this thaen mittai recipe :) . I promised that I would re-visit the recipe and give them a better thaen mittai recipe. So Thank you very very much for taking time to leave a detailed comment in my blog. I will leave the test result of your thaein mittai recipe here. Please visit this page in a couple of days! Until then, mmuahh… :D :D (i said i’m over excited)

    • Sarenya

      Read this after commenting the above.. Will try this soon and let you know!! :) I love thaen mittai!!!!! It would be nice if you mention the quantity too. Thanks :)

      • http://cooking.jingalala.org/ Mangala Meenakshi

        Sarenya,
        I would suggest you to wait until I test this recipe once moreas per Yamuna’s directions. However, if you have already tried and succeeded, would love to hear tips and tricks to make thaen mittai from you :)

  • Sarenya

    Wow… Waiting to try this soon!!! Thanks for the recipe in simple steps :)

  • Rathi

    Hello

    I am huge huge fan of thane mittai – even though I grew up in chennai, I stumbled upon this in the bus stand potti kadai while waiting for bun butter jam LOL. I was over excited when I saw ur recipe and had to try it out (I did a year ag0) and am gonna do it again today – well, why?! coz ur recipe is awesome, it tasted just like the ones I got from the bus stop kadai :) This time am going to let it rest for even longer and add some baking powder and see how the outcome is – just trying to get it more juicier :) and then roll it in powdered sugar for the look :D

    Cant thank you enough for this recipe!

    Rathi

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org/ Mangala Meenakshi

      O Rathi… Thank you so so so much for writing feedback for my Thein Mittai recipe :) Hey do post your Thaen Mithai pictures in GoJingalala’s Facebook Wall and forget not to tag your friends and loved ones!

  • arpitha keerthi

    hi ppl today tried this thane mittai ,,, and i was just saved by a disaster… i used all above methods for preparing it,, but unfortunatly when i put those balls in hot oil after few sec ,,, it started bumpinng out and fell on my hand neck and now its paining badly.. i req u ppl to prepare it very carefully …. its lit risky

    • http://cooking.jingalala.org/ Mangala Meenakshi

      !!!! I’m shocked to hear this Arpitha. But I never experienced this. When I checked the net about your scenario, they say that if the flour has any impurities this kind of situation may occur., Please take care.

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